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Old 05-14-2010, 03:56 PM
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Default jaw pain

My friend had a jaw operation and ever since his jaw has been very sensitive to draft and cold resulting in pain. Does anyone know how he can help himself?
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Old 05-14-2010, 05:23 PM
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Arrow TMJ Syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by metu View Post
My friend had a jaw operation and ever since his jaw has been very sensitive to draft and cold resulting in pain. Does anyone know how he can help himself?
Metu, what kind of jaw operation did your friend have? Also, is cold/draft the only thing that gives pain, otherwise they're ok?

I know you also have a jaw problem. I don't know if this article on TMJ is useful, but I thought I'd post it for you and your friend.

[QUOTE]

> Treating TMJ: Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome
>
> Today, researchers generally agree that temporomandibular joint syndrome falls
into three main categories:
>
> 1. Myofascial pain, the most common form of TMJ syndrome, which is discomfort
or pain in the muscles that control jaw function and the neck and shoulder
muscles.
>
> 2. Internal derangement of the joint, meaning a dislocated jaw or displaced
disc, or injury to the condyle;
>
> 3. Degenerative joint disease, such as osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis
in the jaw joint.
>
> A person may have one or more of these conditions at the same time. Severe
injury to the jaw or temporomandibular joint can cause TMJ syndrome. A heavy
blow, for example, can fracture the bones of the joint or damage the disc,
disrupting the smooth motion of the jaw and causing pain or locking. Arthritis
in the jaw joint may also result from injury.
>
> Head Forward Syndrome or Forward Head Posture has been an issue recognized
more so lately, due to the fact that so many people work on computers. The
pitching of the head forward has actually become a syndrome. This weakens the
entire foundation from the lumbar spine upward. If you can imagine toy blocks
all aligned on top of each other. Now imagine pushing the top block forward. The
other blocks underneath it begin to "stress" as they try to hang on to the top
block. The same thing is happening to our spinal column as we pitch our head too
far forward, instead of keep the head back and aligned over the rest of the
spine.
>
> Other causes of TMJ syndrome are less clear. Some suggest, for example, that a
bad bite (malocclusion) can trigger TMJ syndrome, but recent research disputes
that view. Orthodontic treatment, such as braces and the use of headgear, has
also been blamed for some forms of TMJ syndrome, but studies now show that this
is unlikely.And there is no scientific proof that gum chewing causes clicking
sounds in the jaw joint, or that jaw clicking leads to serious TMJ problems. In
fact, jaw clicking is fairly common in the general population. If there are no
other symptoms, such as pain or locking, jaw clicking usually does not need
treatment.
>
> Researchers believe that most people with clicking or popping in the jaw joint
likely have a displaced disc -- the soft, shock-absorbing disc is not in a
normal position. As long as the displaced disc causes no pain or problems with
jaw movement, no treatment is needed.Some experts suggest that stress, either
mental or physical, may cause or aggravate TMJ syndrome.
>
> People with TMJ syndrome often clench or grind their teeth at night, which can
tire the jaw muscles and lead to pain. It is not clear, however, whether stress
is the cause of the clenching/grinding and subsequent jaw pain, or the result of
dealing with chronic jaw pain or dysfunction. Scientists are exploring how
behavioral, psychological and physical factors may combine to cause TMJ
syndrome.
>
> Exercises for TMJ Syndrome
>
> Milking The Cow
>
> The exercise so often referred to by chiropractors and craniosacral therapists
is Milking the cow.
> Close your eyes.
> Let the jaw relax and slightly open.
> With index and middle fingers of both hands place them on both sides of the
sides of the ears at the cheek bone (zygomatic bone)
> press down and pull the fingers down toward the corner of the jaw (angle of
mandible).
> Repeat this stroking motion SLOWLY, 20-30 times.
> This relaxes the jaw and can often "adjust" the positioning of the condylar
process of the mandible. Relieving tension in the jaw and face.
>
> Fist Resistor
>
> This exercise works using isometrics. Place your fist under your chin. Slowly
open your mouth wide as you resist the downward motion of opening your mouth
with your fist.
>
> Now reverse this motion, pushing upward with your fist, allow your jaw to do
the resisting as you close your mouth with your first.
> Do this 10-15 times s-l-o-w-l-y, 2-3 times per day.
>
> Neck Relaxor
>
> Take a large towel and fold it the long way. Roll the towel up. Now lay on the
floor and place the towel under the curve of your neck. The back of your head
should be able to rest on the floor. Now relax for 15 minutes. This allows the
curve of the neck relax into proper alignment. This exercise can be done as a
great stress reliever as well. Muscles have memory and this exercise allows the
muscles in the neck to "remember" their shape in relation to the cervical spine.
>
> Cash Register
>
> Project the jaw forward as if you are opening a cash register, then bring the
jaw back to its normal position. Do this 8 times, 2-3 times a day.
>
> Figure Eights
>
> Start by dropping the jaw wide open. With your chin, imagine drawing a figure
eight by lifting the jaw, crossing the midline of the body and closing your
mouth at the top of the eight, and then complete the figure eight by moving the
jaw to the other sider, crossing the midline of the body again and finish with
the jaw at the bottom of the eight with the mouth open. Do this exercise 8
times, then repeat going in the opposite direction. Do this 2-3 times a day.
>
> Additional Therapies
>
> Acupuncture: As an acupuncturist, I see this syndrome in my office at least
twice a week. Acupuncture has a great track record for helping TMJ syndrome.
Acupuncture helps by relieving persistent jaw and neck pain as well as relieving
the headaches associated with TMJ syndrome.
>
> Chiropractor: Chiropractors can help to realign the skeletal structure of the
neck and jaw. Spinal problems and TMJ are often found together and an adjustment
can bring great relief.
>
> Craniosacral Therapist: The work of a craniosacral therapist aims at releasing
temporal bones to restore normal function, regardless of the primary cause. This
gentle, non-invasive procedure is very beneficial.
>
> Trigger Point Therapy: is a unique treatment protocol for the treatment of
myofascial pain. Trigger Points produce pain locally and in a referred pattern
and often accompany chronic musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of trigger
point therapy is to eliminate pain and to re-educate the muscles into pain-free
habits.
>
>
> Andrew Pacholyk, MS, L.Ac
> https://www.peacefulmind.com/ailments.htm
[QUOTE]
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Old 05-14-2010, 05:50 PM
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Thank you again kind2creatures . I think you're post might be useful for my friend. I'll also ask my friend for more information and get back to you.
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Old 05-15-2010, 03:40 PM
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I just talked to a man that works with Hospice yesterday and he mentioned that a while back he had TMJ in his jaw and arthritis pain in his joints and muscles. His first doctor suggested surgery...a second opinion doctor told him to take glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate (no MSM) for the TMJ. They attract water into the cartilage matrix and help to stimulate the production of cartilage. He said it helped him a lot in both his joints and muscles in all areas of his body and the cartilage filled in where needed to repair the TMJ. You can't take it if you are allergic to shellfish though. According to what I've read about it, aging people tend to lose their ability to produce enough glucosamine and no food sources are available.

I'm not a doctor...just passing this along and hope it might be helpful. Sorry this print is big...I copied and pasted where I had just sent it to a friend in an email.
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Old 05-15-2010, 04:04 PM
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Prylotherapy may help. Naturopathic doctors do it.
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