#1  
Old 09-11-2006, 03:40 PM
Enlightener
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: im lost, have no idea
Posts: 961
My Mood: Doh
just me is on a distinguished road
Default organic or not organic???

I noticed this afternoon, a commercial for organic rice krispies. In the commercial they are also saying that there are other brands of cereals (like raisen bran) that will be organic too... If the rules are changing to the extreme that rice krispies can be organic, how do we know for sure what is really organic or not.... Now granted, we arent cereal eaters, but I was buying the horizon milk, and read part of an article yesterday that said horizon wasnt actually organic..... How are we suppose to know what is real and what isnt... Supposedly walmart is going to become a big distributor of organic food, and I dont want to buy into the lies of something that isnt organic


(by the way, I posted this on another forum (no not that one) and I will share what they post if anything!!!)
__________________
God is and all is well
~John Greenleaf Whittier~
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-11-2006, 08:45 PM
Lecturer
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Illinois
Posts: 1,082
Mad Scientest is on a distinguished road
Default

Anything can be considered organic it just depends how much they are willing the change the rules.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-12-2006, 02:34 AM
Beloved enlightener...always with us in spirit
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: S.W. Washington
Posts: 762
My Mood: Mellow
nightowl is on a distinguished road
Default

just me,
In knowing more about what's in our food, I found this site interesting. Just click on the state where you live and you will get a list of dairy brands and products sold in your area that do not have rBGH (growth hormone). In Oregon, according to the chart, Horizon Organic milk, cheese, butter and yogurt are rBGH-free.

nightowl


https://www.themeatrix.com/getinvolve...rbgh_list.html
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-12-2006, 09:48 AM
Enlightener
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 506
Marcus is on a distinguished road
Default

Isn't "organic" defined by federal and state regulations?

and why isn't Horizon milk truly orgainc? What did that article say?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-12-2006, 10:07 AM
Enlightener
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: im lost, have no idea
Posts: 961
My Mood: Doh
just me is on a distinguished road
Default

Got the article from the other forum... pinky had posted a thread called interesting site...... I got this page from that site....

https://www.newstarget.com/019806.html hopefully this will take you to the right place.... Something about the cows arent getting pasture.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-13-2006, 08:44 AM
Explorer
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 84
Lab Rat is on a distinguished road
Default

Hi All,

Under the Organic Foods Production Act of 1990 "processed" foods can contain at least 50 percent organically produced ingredients by weight and be certified as “organic”. Or, the Secretary of Agriculture is empowered to grant an exemption for less than 50 percent to permit the word “organic” in the ingredient list.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture administers the National Organic Program (NOP). These are the ones who can permit a “USDA Organic” label to be placed on a product.

I think the term “organic” has in many instances become a hot marketing ploy. Apparently, many people, who are trying to be health conscious, can be enticed by the term “organic”. As an example, a processed food may have on the box “made with organic sugar”. Even though the food product itself is not certified as organic, the box can have the word organic if it can be certified that at least half of the sugar was produced from cane or beets without synthetic pesticides and fertilizers. Consumers can be misled to think that a product is organic when it may not be entirely organic.

Kellogg’s® is a large and powerful food processor. Chances are they have the legal staff necessary to find the loopholes to place "organic" on their Rice Krispies® box.

The processing of food products often removes or destroys ingredients which can be considered healthful. Personally, I have become leery of food products that come in a "box". I have to admit that I still buy a few of these products because I haven’t found better sources. That’s just my two not so shinny pennies worth.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-16-2006, 07:59 AM
Observer
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: uk
Posts: 46
4dharma is on a distinguished road
Default

i also read on another site that the farmer can have an organic field that is surrounded by non organic and although the runoff from the chemicals boosts the growth he can still be called organic.
__________________
www.rawintheuk.wordpress.com

change is a moment of opportunity
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Organic food is no healthier? jfh Nutrition 5 01-27-2010 06:20 AM
If You're Going To Buy Organic, Consider This Harry Hirsute Nutrition 4 10-14-2009 10:19 AM
Is Organic Safer? Matrix Nutrition 11 05-19-2009 09:56 PM
Organic is Better - Study Shows Harry Hirsute Nutrition 0 03-25-2007 03:51 PM
Walmart Goes Organic Marcus Nutrition 6 05-24-2006 05:27 AM